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OFOAM Archives

Ogden Music Festival 2015

Displaying items by tag: bluegrass

Although their sound is rooted in traditional bluegrass, Mile Twelve surveys a broader landscape on their newest album, City on a Hill. The album title alludes to the idealized imagery of a shining city on a hill – a historical phrase that has often been applied to Boston, where the band got its start. All five band members bring their own influences and observations into the music, resulting in a project that feels contemporary, thoughtfully crafted, and relevant. The Mile Twelve lineup offers five of the most promising young musicians in bluegrass: David Benedict (mandolin), Catherine “BB” Bowness (banjo), Bronwyn Keith-Hynes (fiddle), Evan Murphy (guitar, lead vocals), and Nate Sabat (bass, lead vocals). 

City on a Hill follows multiple IBMA Momentum Awards, presented by the International Bluegrass Music Association to emerging bluegrass artists. Mile Twelve won the band category in 2017, shortly before releasing their debut album, Onwards. The following year, Keith-Hynes and Benedict secured IBMA Momentum Awards in instrumental categories, while the band earned two major IBMA Award nominations for Emerging Artist and Instrumental Performance of the Year in 2018.

Famously crowned "The New Queen of Bluegrass" by the Wall Street Journal, Rhonda Vincent's music incorporates savvy contemporary touches while drawing deeply from the authentic traditions of classic bluegrass, with a flawless band that can execute break-neck instrumentals to heart-wrenching ballads. With over 100 awards to their name, Rhonda Vincent and the Rage are the most celebrated band in bluegrass, including Song of the Year, Entertainer of the Year and the unrivaled 7 consecutive Female Vocalist of the Year at IBMA. The Rage is compiled of five musicians including Hunter Berry, Brent Burke, Mickey Harris, Aaron Mcdaris and Josh Williams.

Rhonda Vincent’s new single, “LIKE I COULD” is the RESULT OF A CHAIN REACTION

Rhonda Vincent is no stranger to most anyone in the field of music. Why even Elton John and Bernie Taupin enlisted Rhonda and her iconic friend Dolly Parton, to create a “Queen of Bluegrass” version of their song “Please” for their 50th Anniversary Tribute CD in 2018.

The Grammys honored Rhonda Vincent & The Rage with the 2017 Grammy for Best Bluegrass Album “All The Rage – Volume One” a live project that displays the World Class Talent of Rhonda and her incredible band. She’s one of the hardest working entertainers, in any genre of music, touring an incredible eleven months out of the year. It’s been far too long since the “Queen of Bluegrass” settled down in the studio to create new music, and finally the wait is over.

There wasn’t a song search, or a target recording date. Frankly, the entire process was a continuous chain reaction. The songs presented themselves in the most unlikely of places. The first single, “LIKE I COULD” was discovered while riding in a limousine with Grand Ole Opry Star, Jeannie Seely. Jeannie was sharing her fear of co-writing, and how she finally faced her fear, at the encouragement of fellow Opry member Bill Anderson by writing “LIKE I COULD” with Erin Enderlin and Bobby Tomberlin. She sang her new song as the shuttled rolled along. Rhonda instantly loved it and told Jeannie she wanted to record it. Jeannie, in total amazement, later texted Rhonda to ask if she really wanted to record it or was it merely an impulse reaction. Rhonda really loved it and could not wait to record it.

Even the recording was unplanned. Rhonda was at Ocean Way Studios in Nashville, TN recording a duet for Jeannie Seely’s upcoming project. It was a duet intended for Vince Gill, but when Vince started working on the duet, he felt the harmony was better suited for Rhonda, and called Jeannie to suggest she call Rhonda to sing it with her.

Jeannie’s producer Don Cusic scheduled a day for Rhonda to record at Ocean Way Studios, and as the duet was completed, Don’s afternoon session was canceled. Overhearing this, Rhonda asked if she could have the afternoon session. She quickly called musicians, called Jeannie for a demo and lyrics for her song, and two hours later the new single was recorded.

While this may seem unorthodox for some, Rhonda thrives on living for the moment, and making the most of each opportunity as it presents itself. This was never more evident as you discover the many elements, from the process of finding the songs for the new upcoming project, to the actual recording of the single “LIKE I COULD.”

Rhonda is constantly thinking of new adventures, songs, opportunities, and she loves the excitement and challenge of putting together a plan at the last minute. Anyone who has ever worked with Rhonda Vincent, knows they must be ready at a moment’s notice. There could be an impromptu recording session, a midnight drive to Canada to see Niagara Falls, a video shoot, or even a jam session aboard the Larry’s Country Diner/Country’s Family Reunion Cruise. Her motto is to always be ready for anything. It’s one of the secrets to her success, and a sure sign of the success of her new single “LIKE I COULD.“

From Northern Utah, Alternative Folk/Americana band Mama LongLegs delivers an alluring blend of First Aid Kit's intricate harmonies, with the unique character of bluegrass instruments.

Harris and Simper first met in college where they both studied music. They have spent the last few years writing and performing in different music groups, separately and together. They've teamed up to unleash their warm, seamless vocal harmonies and interplay between Megan's tasteful, flirtatious mandolin and Allie's raw and sensitive guitar playing. They've been influenced by other Folk/Americana musicians such as I'm With Her, Shovels and Rope, The Punch Brothers, and The Dixie Chicks.

Bluegrass band Wood Belly is based out of Colorado's Front Rage, and winner of the Telluride Bluegrass Band Competition (2018). Wood Belly is the musical collective of Chris Weist (mandolin), Craig Patterson (guitar), Chris Zink (dobro), Aaron McCloskey (banjo) and Taylor Shuck (bass). A Wood Belly song has its own lyrical persona and masterful arrangement; rooted in bluegrass tradition and planted solidly in contemporary innovation.

A nominee in the 2018 IBMA Momentum Awards, Wood Belly has shared bills with Del McCoury Band, The Steeldrivers, Billy Strings, Molly Tuttle, Jeff Austin Band, Front Country, Wood & Wire, Trout Steak Revival, Steel Wheels, and many more.

Della Mae is a GRAMMY-nominated, Nashville-based, all-female string band made up of lead vocalist/guitarist Celia Woodsmith, 2-time national champion fiddle player Kimber Ludiker, mandolinist Jenni Lyn Gardner, and upright bassist Zoe Guigueno. Hailing from across of North America, and reared in diverse musical styles, they are one of the most charismatic and engaging roots bands touring today. They have traveled to over 30 countries spreading peace and understanding through music.

Their mission as a band is to showcase top female musicians, and to improve opportunities for women and girls through advocacy, mentorship, programming, and performance.

The future of acoustic music: Jubilee consists of some of the top young award-winning acoustic musicians on the scene today. Known for their relentless groove and breathtaking improvisation, they bring a fresh approach to traditional bluegrass, old-time, and even work their genre-bending magic on a little jazz and funk. Ranging in age from 12-15, the musicians have performed at a range of venues including the CBA Father's Day Bluegrass Festival, Berkeley’s Freight and Salvage, the Gallo Center for the Performing Arts, Sacramento’s Crest Theater, The Watkins Family Hour, and just last month were featured at the International Bluegrass Music Association’s World of Bluegrass in Raleigh, NC.

They have appeared both together and individually with a long list of monumental musicians and mentors including Darol Anger and Mike Marshall, Mads Tolling, Roy “Futureman” Wooten (of Bela Fleck and the Flecktones), George Cole (of the David Grisman Quintet), Hanneke Cassel and Mike Block, Sean and Sarah Watkins, and toured with Alasdair Fraser and the Scottish Fiddlers as well as The Bee Eaters. The boys, Miles and Teo, were recently featured on a TEDx Talk with Phoebe Hunt.

“It's a blessing to hear a group of young musicians blending Traditional Bluegrass and Newgrass sounds with such fire and energy. The love they have for the genre means the upcoming generation will be great. Don't miss the musicianship and energy this young dynamic group brings to the stage.”
- Keith Barnacastle, The Bluegrass Standard

Jubilee is Aerie Walker on cello, Tuki Walker on fiddle and vocals, Miles Quale on fiddle and vocals, and Teo Quale on mandolin and vocals. Listen to their new EP Jubilee on iTunes, GooglePlay or cdbaby.com.

Hailed as “the hottest band in the Wasatch” by the Intermountain Acoustic Music Association, Pixie and The Partygrass Boys is composed of lifelong professional musicians drawn together by a common love of bluegrass and skiing in the Wasatch. Featuring soulful, often harmonic vocals and solid strings and rhythm, this tight-knit crew was born out of the belly of a warm cabin after a long day on the slopes- drinking whiskey and singing into the night. With a high energy sound and a love for silly outfits, they travel the land spreading the gospel of whiskey, chickens, and fun for everyone. 

With her fourth album, Undercurrent, Sarah Jarosz makes a studied departure from her previous records, shifting the emphasis from her skills as a multi-instrumentalist to her songwriting and vocal performance. Undercurrent accentuates the growth and maturity that Jarosz, now 25, has achieved since graduating from New England Conservatory and moving to New York City. The change in approach garnered Jarosz two Grammy Awards in 2017—Best Folk Album for Undercurrent and Best American Roots Performance for “House Of Mercy.” Undercurrent also picked up the award for 2017 Album of the Year from Folk Alliance International.

Sugar and the Mint (Formerly Generation Band) was started by The Sharlot Hall Museum in Prescott, Arizona in February 2011. Students were chosen by audition and initially it was formed as a youth cultural music conservatory. In 2014, Sugar and the Mint (Generation) parted ways with Sharlot Hall Museum, (after the program lost funding) and ventured out on its own. They have since become a professional and dynamic young musical group. They play a blend of new old-time, contemporary bluegrass and indie-folk music. They have performed at venues and events such as the The Prescott Opry, Yavapai College, The Yavapai County Fair, Payson Fiddle Festival, The Raven Cafe, Tim’s Toyota Center in Prescott Valley, Tempe Festival of the Arts, Prescott Farmer’s Market, Wickenburg Bluegrass Festival, Pickin’ in the Pines Bluegrass Festival, Prescott’s Folk Music Festival, Town of Bagdad, AZ, Arts Prescott Coop Gallery, Acker Night Musical Showcase and many others. They can often be seen playing informally at Prescott's Courthouse Square during various Arts and Crafts Fairs.

In 2014, they won FIRST PLACE at the Payson Fiddle-in-Band competition and FIRST PLACE at The Old-time Country Band competition at the Wickenburg Fiddle championships. In 2015, they took THIRD PLACE at Pickin’ in the Pines Bluegrass Festival and were honored to play in the second round on the main stage. In 2016, Sugar and the Mint (at that time GENERATION) took FIRST PLACE at the 2016 Pickin' in the Pines Music Festival in Flagstaff, and FIRST PLACE at the 2016 Wickenburg Bluegrass Festival Gospel Band Competition, in Wickenburg, Arizona.

They are frequently employed to play music at festivals, private parties, weddings, fund raising events, local school events, local eateries, art galleries, and church events.

From his humble beginnings in Alaska, Frank Solivan has built a reputation as a monster mandolinist — and become a major festival attraction with his band, Dirty Kitchen.

Solivan, with banjoist Mike Munford, 2013 IBMA Banjo Player of the Year, award winning guitarist Chris Luquette and bassist Jeremy Middleton, simmer a bluegrass/newgrass stew from instrumental, vocal and songwriting skills so hot, they were named IBMA’s Instrumental Group of the Year in 2014 and again in 2016.

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